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Halloween 2 Michael Myers Laurie Strode

‘Halloween’ Director John Carpenter Explains Why He Made Michael Myers & Laurie Strode Siblings

The latest Halloween sequel from 2018 was a bold new entry in the franchise which didn’t just return to the roots of the original film, but ignored the events of every other film in between. And because of this controversial decision, the movie dropped a major plot line featured in every film featuring Michael Myers ever since Halloween II in 1981. The movie removed the familial ties between Laurie and Michael – they were no longer siblings, a concept introduced in Halloween II.

There’s been plenty of debate between the concept, whether or not it should’ve been included in the newest sequel, and how exactly the idea came to be. While it was previously suggested that John Carpenter wrote it up while drunk and struggling to pen the original Halloween sequel – Carpenter has opened up a little more about the process.

According to a new interview between Carpenter and ComicBook.com,

“Well, the brother reveal was caused by NBC. NBC purchased the rights to show Halloween on network television. But our movie was too short for them. So we needed to add some time. I think we had to add, what was it, eight minutes or something like that, I don’t remember. And there was nothing to add. The first movie was just what I wanted to make. I don’t have anything to add. So I came up with this brother thing. It was awful, just awful. But, I did it.”

It definitely makes sense now why Carpenter chose to do it, and I’m glad the idea is something they ignored for the 2018 sequel. It always seemed like a cheapened idea for the sake of continuing the plot – and, frankly, Michael Myers deserves better than to blandly follow a MacGuffin around even if it’s played by Jamie Lee Curtis (or any other available substitute). The new film was a lot better simply for bringing some more basic elements back to the franchise and doing what the first film did best.

Hopefully we can expect that same level of authenticity in Halloween Kills and Halloween Ends, beginning with Kills on October 16, 2020.

Source: ComicBook.com

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