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People Are Trying To Get Mark Wahlberg Cancelled For Past Hate Crimes

The world has been having all kinds of new announcements and revelations following the protests that occurred after the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis. Now it seems one of those revelations happens to be the apparent hate crimes that actor Mark Wahlberg faced in his past. The revelation was made after Mark Wahlberg shared a tribute for Black Lives Matter on social media. Apparently his hate crimes had an entire section on Wikipedia.

The hate crimes that Mark Wahlberg was charged for occurred in the 1980’s – and many social media users have been throwing them back at him. As you can see in the below example:

It’s a crime that he’s since attempted to get expunged from his record, something that some believe should remain. Others, however, tend to believe that Wahlberg should be forgiven considering his age and the setting in which it occurred – saying he was simply trying to follow the other kids.

Regardless, he was part of another hate crime two years later. At age 16, he apparently attacked two Vietnamese men when he was attempting to steal beer near his home in Dorchester. It occurred when a Vietnamese man named Thanh Lam was carrying two cases of beer out of his vehicle. Wahlberg then hit him over the head with a wooden board while calling him a “Vietnam f***ing s***.”

He apparently then used another Vietnamese man named Hoa Trinh for help to hide from a nearby police car, before punching him in the face and making comments about his “slant-eyed looks.”

At this point, Mark Wahlberg has been convicted of assault and battery, marijuana possession, and criminal contempt for violating his civil rights injunction. He soon went to prison and was eventually released after 45 days with a two-year sentence at the Deer Island House of Correction in Boston.

Again, some people tend to think he paid his price – including one of the men he assaulted, Hoa Trinh – who he was able to personally apologize to in recent years. Nevertheless, some find that it is something that needs to be looked at all these years later. And it seems there’s no better time than now following all of the protests.

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